Posts Tagged ‘signs’

Happy Birthday Alfred Hitchcock

August 13, 2011

Happy Birthday Alfred Hitchcock. (1899–1980)
For thous of you unfamiliar with this genius, Hitchcock had no morals, he did not believe in them. Still he loved drama and he loved story and though that they did not work with out morals. (To paraphrase) he said that to create drama, you draw a clear moral line and then have a character obviously cross it (in an entertaining fashion). Now, when there is a moral law and you break it, there must be a consequence. You are now waiting for the consequence and that creates drama. It’s funny how, as a creator he mirrored his CREATOR much more than he did as a creation. Still, not all of his films end up on the moral high ground, but he did make some of the best films ever and many of them at least land on the right foot. I suggest you start with films like Vertigo, Rear Window, Notorious and Rope. I would avoid films like “The Trouble With Harry” that were supposed to be funny because he didn’t include the “moral line.” All he accomplishes here is to prove that yes, he needed the moral line to create great film.
If you want to go modern, I would not bother with the remakes but check out M. Knight Shamalon’s “Signs” From the opening music you can tell this is a tribute to Mr. Hitchcock and from the raw genius and strong moral lines, it is a fitting one.

M Night Shyamalan’s The Last Airbender

July 20, 2010

What is it?

Based on a very inventive and fun cartoon from Nickelodeon, The Last Air Bender is an adventure in another world. This world is made up of four nations, Water, Fire, Earth, and Air. Some members of each nation can “Bend” or move their element through space. Though there may be plenty of other applications, It’s mostly used as a marshal art to fight others with.

Balance is thrown off when the Fire Nation attacks the other three, in an attempt to rule the word. In the midst of this conflict, To Teens, Katara (Nicola Peltz) and Sokka (Twilight’s Jackson Rathbone) Discover the last living Air Bender, 12 year old Aang (Noah Ringer). Aang is not only the last of his people, he is “The Avatar.” A special warrior who has the ability to master all four elements, Bridge the Physical and Spiritual world, Bring balance and understanding, as well as kick major butt with his awesome power.

How was it?
The scope and magnitude of the film raises the level of the film in such a way that the failure of the movie to do anything worth while is simply magnified to a level that begs comparisons to Ed Wood. Right away the acting is on par with a well done Christmas play over at your local jr. high. Unfortunate the dialog complements the acting perfectly. Then there is the story line, it played like a ten year old explains season one of the tv show ( and then this happened, and then that happened..) as a studio exec’s secretary took dictation. The special effects were good but the actual “fighting” was boring and confusing. Where most the fighting was done with element bending, what you see is elongated ti-Che looking dancing with stuff swirling around them. As impressive as the dancing and effects were, I often thought “oh just punch him!”
This is the problem if you only watch the movie, but if you are a fan of the show (or like me, and watched it because you were excited about the movie) you will be even more disappointed. The show is for kids and has goofy humor, but is a lot o fun. Not only is the story very well thought out, the characters are dimensional and interesting. The result is that you care about the characters (even the “bad guys”) and are very interested in the story. All the humor is gone as well as the heart. Aang himself no longer fears being the avatar because he will have to sacrifice his own child hood for the good of the world. (A pain that makes him a real character who you can feel for as well as allowing him to be a fun character.) In the film Aang does not want this duty because the avatar can never have a family. Not only is he a twelve year old boy hoping to grow up to be a family man, its even more ridiculous when you realize he was raised by monks in an all male temple! The result on the movie is it suffers more by comparison. (thus you suffer more as well.)
Just to top everything off, the last image on the screen are the words “written, directed, and produced by M. Night Shamalon. This is killer. This man is the genus behind “Signs.” intact, of his 9 films, one I have not seen, one was silly, six were nothing short of amazing films that rival the films of Alfred Hitchcock, then, the ninth is this atrocity afflicted on film and unleaded on sad audiences with overpriced tickets trying to comfort themselves with thoughts like “maybe he will fix it in the sequel” or “at least I wasn’t watching the new Twilight.” but then you remember that Mr Shamalon had the nerve to include a twilight vampire in the cast, the hurt and sorrow return like flowing water that bends into tears as you just move on to the next question.

Was it worth the extra $3 for 3D?
I think the $3 for 3D was much better spent than the rest of the ticket. The effects were the best part of the film and they looked cool in 3D. I did think the effect was not as flat as Alice in wonderland but not as good as the preview for Voyage o the Dawn treader. There was something weird going on when they has fur hoods on and it got blurry when they panned (which they did a  lot). Maybe if the movie was better, the slight defects in the 3D would detract from the story telling, but with no real storytelling in sight – the 3D helps you focus on the effects.

Is it good for children?
There are some things that may scare small children. Armies are hunting down a 12 year old. But mostly kids will be confused, and fans of the show will be disappointed that “Saka’s not funny and Aang is boring.”

Was it racist?
The tv show has all the characters oriental, though each people group is a different sub set where the group all look like each other but do not look like the other nations or tribes. So, though they are all oriental, you can tell what people group they belong to by there racial features. This seems to me to be a nightmare for casting. So what M. Night has done in this film was to make each nation a fully different race. This is not racist but racial. (If you are unsure of the difference, ask Rhett and link.) Still some point out that the water tribe are heroes and are white while the fire nation are villeins and they are dark. First, the fire nation is is a little more complex that. (That comes through despite the shallow nature of the film.) Further more, the fire nation is Indian! The same nationality as the director / writer / producer. So why would he cast his own race as the fire nation? I do think all the races he picked fit well with the look of the show but the choice was probably just so he could give himself a cameo as a fire nation soldier.

What about spiritual issues?
The show for season one uses Hindu symbolism but in season two starts to get into Hindu/buddhist philosophy as well. Though in the season finally of one, princess Yue is given Christ symbolism when the moon god is killed and she gives her life for his resurrection and the physical salvation Of her people. In the movie the scene is so rushed that the beauty and pain of sacrifice is just laborious. All the buildup that points out the symbolism is reduced to the princess putting her arms out while in close up. Aang himself is a savior of a fictional world with many links to Jesus. In the finally of the second season Aang himself is killed and redirected and along the way strikes a Michelangelo influenced Jesus pose.

 Like Yue, Aang’s symbolism is boiled down to a modification of his back tattoo.
So, even spiritually the show is complex and interesting, and the movie is confusing chunky and unsatisfactory.

What is your recommendation?
This could have been M. Night Shamalon’s “Lord of the Rings,” but ended up his “Plan 9 from Outer Space.” this is a dull trip through cartoon cliff notes is not worth it on any level. Still if you are going to bring your kids to this film or the show you will want to talk about the fantasy world’s philosophy and it’s links to the our worlds philosophies, the truth and the lies.
My real recommendation… Start at M. Night’s “Wide Awake” and keep going until you get to “Lady in the Water.” Just stop before you get to “The Happening” and you will never have to bother with “The Last Airbender.”
(I’ll get back to you after I finish season three and yes I will go to the other two sequels.)

Christopher’s Top Picks of the Decade (1/1/2000-1/1/2010)

January 28, 2010

It took all month but here are

Christopher’s Top 20 Picks (with 3 “Ties and an Honorable Mention) of the Decade

(1/1/2000-1/1/2010)

  1. Lord Of The Rings (1 movie in 3 parts)
  2. The Passion of the Christ
  3. Unbreakable
  4. tie – DISTRICT 9 Pride and Prejudice 
  5. The Exorcism of Emily Rose  
  6.  Signs
  7. To End All Wars
  8. The Village
  9. The Chronicles of Narnia: The Lion The Witch and the Wardrobe 
  10. Lars and the Real Girl 
  11. Luther 
  12. B000JLTR8QM. Night Shyamalan’s Lady in the Water
  13. Napoleon Dynamite
  14. In The Bedroom
    Note: “The Bedroom” in the title refers to a compartment of a Lobster Trap
  15. Man On Fire
  16. I Am Legend
  17. The Lost Skeleton of Cadavra
  18. Phone Booth
  19. tie Nanny McPhee Up
  20. tie Danielson a Family Movie (or, Make A Joyful Noise HERE) Food Inc

Honorable Mention

Bella theatrical one sheet

Bella

Fireproof

This film was not the best done, or the most moving. Several films not on this list were better films. (The Spider Man films, Inglorious B——-s, Juno, Iron Man and even  Twilight, were all better films.) Still, a church got together and made a good film with a great message, and I think that should be applauded.

(Why You Should Go See) DISTRICT 9 – Question Entertainment Christian Movie REVIEW (spoilers)

September 28, 2009

 

district9_poster-689x1024

District 9 

Signs

The Boy vs. The Cynic

John Reuben

Did you see the District 9 Tribute over at “Lunch Bag Art“?

henry poole is here Question Entertainment Christian review and analysis

August 14, 2009

ABIGAIL ROONEYs jewelry from http://www.liasophia.com/abigailrooney

On DVD

Henry Poole Is Here

Frank Peretti’s The Visitation

January 26, 2009

visitation

What Is It?

Ralph Winter made a lot of money when he produced the critically acclaimed X-Men Movies, and more money when he produced the critically disdained Fantastic Four movies. After X-men, he was looking for other work that could be brought to screen. Literary work that, like comic books, would have a built in audience to make the movie an immediate success (moviegoers would then tell their friends , thereby spreading the movie’s fan base) . This search led Winter to the supernatural thrillers of Christian author Frank Peretti. The rumored goal here is to make two low budget films (2003‘s Buffy-esque “The Hang Man’s Curse” and this film) to prove to Hollywood that there is money to be made in Peretti’s books. This realization of profit will be Winter’s ammunition to make a big budget version of Peretti’s mega hit “This Present Darkness”.

So, to the subject at hand

… This is a “direct to video” horror… e r… creepy film. A Midwest town is put on the map when miraculous signs start invading their benign existence. From supernatural healings to the likeness of Jesus’ face in the stained tile of the bathroom wall, everyone is touched by the accompanying message : “He Is Coming.” .

Revival meetings start. One pastor (Randy Travis) believes this may be demonic. One former pastor (Martin Donovan) believes this may be linked to the ritualistic murder of his wife. One mom  (Kelly Lynch) is fearful her son (Noah Segan) is in danger and the son, along with most the town, believes that a messiah has come for them… and maybe he has.

How Was It?

This comes off like a good episode of the WB’s “Supernatural” with a side of “CSI” for spice. It’s a little rough at the beginning . Some of it is cool. Other parts, particularly the “shocking” bits, come out flat. As the film goes on, it finds its pacing and starts to entertain in a worthwhile way.

Is It Good For Kids?

The movie is very clean. Still, this may be disturbing, especially (spoiler) the child abuse crucifixion scene. Though this film is fiction, it deals with demons and the spiritual realm . The idea that some of this may “be possible” may be scarier than the actual movie.

There are also some allusions to sexuality.

What About Spiritual Issues?

They are monumental. This film deals with spiritual warfare. It clearly shows Satan as evil and Jesus as the only real and logical answer to that evil. The only issue here is that it may overemphasize evil. Still , instead of totally reveling in it, we see the that evil is there and that it needs to be dealt with.

What Is Your Recommendation?

It’s not “The Exorcism of Emily Rose ”, “The Green Mile” or “Signs ” but it’s still fun. If you are looking for something to rent, and you are free of younger kids, it would be worth picking up. And hey , if you like it, you can support the prospect of bigger, cooler movies, with a Christian theme, hitting the theater.

Did I mention that the screen play was done by Brian Godawa who also wrote “To End All Wars “? (I can’t believe you haven’t seen “To End All Wars ” yet!)

B000BZISXK The Visitation

1595541209 The Visitation by Frank Peretti

1581345283 This Present Darkness by Frank Peretti

B00021R7BM To End All Wars

Signs

December 21, 2008

signs


What Is It?
M. Night Shyamalan‘s Signs is a huge hit film by the writer director often favorably compared to Steven Spielberg
 and Alfred Hitchcock. It’s the story of a family living on a farm. The dad, Mel Gibson, is a former pastor who is holding a grudge against God due to his wife’s accidental death. He has two young children and his brother lives with them to help out now that it’s a single family house hold. That seems like enough to be a great film, but we pile on top of that the fact that crop circles have been found in the family’s corn field. (Do you know how hard it is to break down corn?) The family, and the world, wrestles with the question “is this for real”. Then the next avalanche of questions comes quick and over shadow the first. “Is there a God?” “Will he help?” “Does he care?” This inquiry becomes the cattalos to move the film from B-movie plot, to emotional drama and creepy (maybe) Sci-Fi uneasiness.
How Was It?
This is a great peace of film making. The uneasiness of the possibility of alien’s just drives into the open, fears and family unrest that seems to have been lurking since the death of the father’s wife. The acting is great, the cinematography is beautiful and the creepy veneer works through the whole film. Shyamalan does some amazing things here. Like including touching stories from Graham about the days his two children were born, in the middle of one of the most perilous scenes in the film. As an aside: I have spoken to a few people who were really disappointed with this film. It seems the common denominator was that they thought it was an “Alien” film. They missed all the great family drama waiting for it to be “War of the Worlds.”
Is It Good For Kids?
It is dark and spooky. There is some violence that does not promote violence, but is heavy on the emotions. There are also a couple of cuss words (that are shown as bad). All in all I think younger kids would miss the point and just get fodder for nightmares.


You can check www.ScreenIt.com for a complete break down of elements shown on the screen.



How about Spiritual Issues?
The title of the film is not referring to aliens, but from a conversation where Mel Gibson’s character, Rev. Graham Hess, asks if you are the kind of person that “Sees coincidence, or sees miraculous see signs” Though out the film you see Morgan (Rory Culkin) try to deal with the distance between himself and his earthly father Graham Hess. This serves as a picture of Graham’s struggle with his heavenly father. You even hear Graham quote lines from his son said to him when he is talking to God. Graham acts in his own strength doubting that God will “bother” to act. This film is filled with ideas about faith and how life is 100% different if God is actually involved in the lives of the people who trust Him. .


(DON’T READ THIS PART IF YOU DON’T WANT ME TO SPOIL THE END)


 At the end, Graham sees that all the odd little things about his family were orchestrated by God so that God himself could literally save the life of Graham’s son. The closing shot of the film show’s Graham back in his Priest outfit and the cross on the wall is back. (During the rest of the film you could only see a “clean” spot where the cross had been.)
What Is Your Recommendation?
If you can handle something a little on the creepy side, this is an excellent film! From the beautiful camera work, the subtle performances, the great script and the well crafted presentation of very important essages, this is something to encourage the believer and share with those still unsure of God.


B00005JL3T Signs


The Films of M Night Shyamalan [part 2] a Question Entertainment extra

December 11, 2008

B000QUU4M8 Signs / The Village

B00064LJVE The Village

B000JLTR8Q Lady in the Water

0316017345 Lady in the Water

B001DZOC6Y The Happening

The Films of M Night Shyamalan [part 1] a Question Entertainemnet extra

December 9, 2008

B00067BC18 Wide Awake

B00004BZIY The Sixth Sense

B00003CXQA Unbreakable

B00005JL3T Signs

B0000640SC Stuart Little

B0000AGQ5Z M. Night Shyamalan Vista Series Collection (The Sixth Sense/Signs/Unbreakable)

M. Night Shyamalan’s Lady in the Water

December 7, 2008

J.R.R. Tolkien wrote an essay called “ON FAIRY-STORIES”. It was Tolkien’s ideas on what fairy tales were and how they can effect, or impact, our lives. He then wrote a story about an artist called “Leaf by Nigel” to illustrate the concepts in the his essay. Having read “On Fairy-Stories“, M. Night’s fairy tale and film, could have been re-titled “Lady by Shyamalan .” You could read this review, or you could just read On Fairy-Stories and then go see the “Lady in the Water”.

What Is It?

As with Shyamalan’s “Signs” and “Unbreakable” this movie is about the genre invading our day to day life. This is a Fantasy Fairy tale. It’s about sea nymphs who inspire people to use there God-given gifts. But there are monsters whom can sometimes hurt the nymphs when they are out of the water. With the bed time story read under the opening credits, the invasion begins. A local apartment foreman/janitor (Paul Giamatti ) discovers a sea nymph named…. “Story“ (Bryce Dallas Howard who played Ivy in The Village) lives in his pool.

How Was It?

In my humble opinion, it was wonderful, with both meanings of the word. The bedtime story itself seems a bit silly at times, but it’s supposed to be something made up by someone’s grandmother. A more sophisticated tale would have taken away from the point of the movie. The characters are fun and interesting, and you learn to care about them very fast. Though many of them represent something, they still come off as real.

Is It Good For Children?

This movie is scary at times, capturing the true dark nature of the “un-Disney-fied” fairy tales. For some children this could inspire bad dreams and the fear of bumps in the lawn. (That’s what the monsters look like when they are hiding.) There is also a teen girl who is, at times, dressed inappropriately. She is not very “alluring” or shown as positive, but is lacking as a positive role model for young girls. We also saw more of the sea nymph’s legs than we needed. Finally, they use God as a cuss word a couple of times.

Though, when the nymph first comes to the Janitors house, he is not sure why a young lady is there, and tells her that he might be old fashion, but he does not want her to spend the night. The above are things to consider, however, it is a good story with a good message.

You can check Screenit.com for a complete break down of what is on the screen.

What About Spiritual Issues?

Spirituality is more at the forefront of things then in “The Village,” but less than “Signs.” Still there is a lot here, and it’s good stuff. The story is something that inspires us to be what God intended. To fight for others; to give over our pain; to grow; and even be sacrificial. There are also a lot of little comments to suggest that God is working in this.

From here on in, all the Spiritual information will be SPOILERS!

The main character was a doctor who gave that up when someone broke into his house and killed his family. He does not share that with anyone. He then finds (and gives) healing by admitting his loss, and his disconnect from God because he saw God in them, not unlike Mel Gibson‘s character in “Signs.”

There are also “Three creatures with one name” who are supposed to live in the trees. They are supposed to stop the monsters that attack nymphs when the monsters break the rules and attack when they are not supposed to. After the Nymph is attacked when she should not be, the creatures do not come. The janitor comments on the lack of justice when the “Three in one” doesn’t help. It turns out that it wasn’t a lack of justice, but that the human characters were not doing what they needed to do and that’s why they did not see the justice come from above. These creatures are though to be evil because they may have killed there parents. All we know about them for sure is that they are the rule keepers. There is also a great character who is exercising half his body. His right arm is 4 inches thicker than his left. He calls himself a scientist and describes working out as his experient. Like many scientists, when you are just looking at the physical world you will only be a half developed human. At the end he finds that there is more than physical strength.

The nymph reveals a list of people who need to be assembled to help her. Their qualities are listed, but the main characters need to figure out who fits each role. They mistake a group of burned out metal heads for the group they needed,What they really needed was a loving group of sisters. So though the group of dead beat friends looked right, they were just a poor substitute for a loving family.

A writer (played by M. Knight Shyamalan himself) is prophesied over. He is told that he should write the book he’s writing because it will inspire people and change the world in positive ways, but that he will be killed for the things he writes in his book. He is left with the decision to be martyred for doing what he is called to do, or to be safe, but not fulfill his calling. There is also a man who lives in a depression, as he only sees the bleak reality in this world, but longs to return to the faith of a child. There is so much to learn in this film.

What Is Your Recommendation?

Like I said in the beginning, read J.R.R. Tolkien’s “On Fairy Tales.” Go see “Lady in the Water.” Then go out for dinner and have a great conversation about magical stories inspiring us to seek God and His will. This is why I added it to my list of “Must See” movies.

Bonus Question:

If it’s so good, why are all the reviews so bad?

(other than this one of course)

I think there are two reasons.

One, the movie is not about the fairy tale it self but about how we deal with fairytales. So focusing on the fairy tale will cause you to miss the point.

(Just like: most people who didn’t like “Signs” say the stuff about the aliens was dumb. That is because “Signs” is not about the aliens, it’s about the family.)

Two, A minor theme in the film is “People who review movies, by and large, are idiots who don’t understand movies.” It’s a very rare person who can be told something like that and still enjoy what they are watching. Usually it’s only the Christian’s who can have what they believe slammed for 92 minuets and still say they liked the movie.

Of corse, there could also be those who heard the message and actulay grew with the chalenge. But I doubt it.

Did you know that “Citizen Kane,” heralded by the critics and film teachers as the best film ever, opened to bad reviews.